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saturday night whims by bohoomil saturday night whims by bohoomil
Well, I loved my first typewriter, but there were certain things I couldn't do with it. :)

Just fooling around with Awesome, Zenburn, and all the nonsense in between.
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:iconllewton:
llewton Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2012
so i stop by and find out you're an archer :) and i miss my awesome session all of a sudden :)
although obviously awesome tags are very recognizable but i somehow feel this bottom bar in particular should be in the dictionary to define "awesome wm look and feel"
i always take the custo in other directions, my awesome looks more like other wms.. which probably isn't a good idea. a little like those folk creating "macs" out of buntus :D
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:iconbohoomil:
bohoomil Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2012
:ashamed: :blush: :B (I didn't remember I was using a ck kernel back then.) You're extremely kind, thank you. However, it's a nonsense that can't be put next to things that you can do. As soon as I got to the point where my desktop had become usable, I would helplessly and hopelessly squeeze my invention and got nothing in return. I've always been fascinated with the diversity of UIs, especially various *nices, so the emergence of Linux let me see and touch what I considered a true & hardcore computing. Alas, my skills are far behind yours, and it must be some genetic issue. ;)

And Arch, yes, I still have it installed as a reference distro for things I try to do myself. Today my main OS is CRUX, which I absolutely love, and in the meantime I'm playing with LFS (because I love to know how to do things myself, and do'em right: this is the ultimate fun). The last thing must be genetic as well, because as a kid I wasn't fully satisfied with my dad's camera unless I dismantled it to bare pieces. (Unfortunately, he's been always way more interested in football than in the order of the universe, so he couldn't understand me at all... :( )

Anyway, thank you once more: it is an honor to leave my footprints in such a decent collection as yours. :happybounce: :)
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:iconllewton:
llewton Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2012
you're kiddin me, right :D i'm the n00b here by comparison. all i do is install core debian, add X and a WM. crux, LFS? that's well over my head. i'd be very interested to hear how you progress with LFS. what do you do for repos and updates, upgrades and so on. i would love to set aside time to do something like that myself simply for learning purposes but i don't know when that might even be..
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:iconbohoomil:
bohoomil Featured By Owner Mar 30, 2012
No kiddin'. :) Binary distributions--some of the mainstream at least--are way more difficult to handle. Just think of all the stuff that must be carefully done in order to create a single *.deb or *.rpm package, let alone the separate *.dev packages that should be created (and / or installed) if you want a system that strictly follows the model of a distro. Debian, CentOS or SuSE are great distros for end users or corporate purposes: stable and rock solid, great when you want an 'install and forget' solution. (My dated Debian Lenny based mini print server, whose only purpose is to handle an old Canon laser printer, is a good example here. The system is a frozen VM, operating as a part of a tiny home network, and for +2 years has been a successful antidote against the lousy Canon's driver policy.)

However, they can be a real pain when you want a more vanilla-like system, or a heavily customized and optimized one, exclusively for your machine, or you prefer more bleeding-egde applications, or simply you want a system for learning purposes. Then those DIY alternatives shine, and you sooner start to understand how all those pieces work together. LFS sits on the extreme pole here because to make it maintainable and usable in the most trivial sense, deploying a nice package manager in it seems like a must. (BTW, it was one of the reasons I got back to LFS: to learn how to maintain a system, how to keep track of dependencies, how to build and update the toolchain, how to cross-compile things and build them for various architectures.) Arch, on the other hand, is probably the best compromise when it comes to a system that combines the ease of a binary distro (and its robustness: I've never experienced any glitch that would force me to reinstall the whole system) with the user's freedom to make the system whatever they want it to be. Besides, Arch is probably the only Linux variant I know which comes with a really rich collection of apps: even if a binary doesn't exist in an official repo, it will probably be present in the AUR as a PKGBUILD script.

And finally CRUX, which comes with less support and even smaller core install than Arch, but that makes it a really nice OS when you want more flexibility and less dependence on a rolling release model. CRUX was the first distro that let me play with the init scripts and take control over those cir. 15 seconds when the system starts. Besides, as I don't use the initial root filesystem image in it, CRUX boots directly to the kernel which I tailor to strictly match the hardware profile; this way the only modules loaded at the end of the boot process belong to Vbox and nVidia, while the necessary ones are built in the kernel. Software maintenance is done by pkgutils, a very simple but efficient package management solution, with a pretty basic dependency tracking. With all the tweaks, it's probably the fastest and snappiest system I've ever had, while remaining robust and reliable (therefore it was promoted to my main OS, something I didn't plan to be honest).

I believe that you may like to play with Linux on a different level as well. It's fun and often much easier than you would believe. :) Several habits become your second nature sooner or later, and you don't consider them odd anymore. If you realize it's not your cup of tea, you can always get back to one of the mainstream alternatives. It costs nothing but your time after all. ;)
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:iconllewton:
llewton Featured By Owner Mar 31, 2012
well the crux of it :D for me is precisely that i have so little time to tinker, although my reflex is clearly to do that. for that reason i settle on debian core, and for that reason i never write themes from scratch just mod them silly :) i work "in the internets", it's me and my computer all day every day, and thank god for the last 3 years just linux, both on work and home machines.. but much as i love my computers, i get a little sick of them by the end of the day and most often just can't spend even more time at it, to ever be able to do your type of installs. i probably had that chance when i was a teenager, and next chance will be when i retire.. or who knows :)but i have to tell you, i smugly feel bad for the folk who have not discovered linux. it's free as in, "free person", nevermind free software or zero cost :D
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:iconzhuravlik26:
zhuravlik26 Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2011
Zenburn everywhere. Nice.
Maybe two music statuses are superfluous, but everything else is great.
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:iconbohoomil:
bohoomil Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2011
That's a terrific comment, thank you so much! :bow: Actually, there's one mpd status on the bottom; the other in the top left corner it's the terminal title (it can't be easily said what it really is, though). It's definitely not perfect but I'm quite happy with my first tiling attempts, and Awesome makes the transition from the floating realm quite painless and smooth. And the experience is really great. :)
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:iconzhuravlik26:
zhuravlik26 Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2011
Oh, I see now that it is really the window title. :) I thought it was a creeping line-like widget for mpd. First impressions are misleading sometimes.

My congratulations for your first attemps in using Awesome. It is excellent WM, despite frequent configuration breaks. Although, configuration breaks force you to learn Lua better. :) I'm using awesome for a year now, and even xmonad had no chances to tempt me to remove "exec awesome" from .xinitrc.

Your screen has a common style, and in spite of using default Zenburn theme it looks good.

Good luck in awesome adventures! =)
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:icondjura-san:
djura-san Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2011
fantastic mate. i love that gap in awesome (i was trying to get the same one in my dwm but it is hard to get that). +1 right away :)
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:iconbohoomil:
bohoomil Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2011
Ha, ha, thank you, that makes my day (or night for that matter). :D I guess dwm is much better protected against foolish hackin' steps, and as such it doesn't allow for anything that can't eventually make things really better. ;)
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:iconradiceta:
radiceta Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2011
could you please post your .Xdefaults for color setting, your mc.ini for mc theme and .ncmpcpp settings? It looks great
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:iconbohoomil:
bohoomil Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2011
Thank you, that's very kind of you. Sure, you can take a look at the configs, but this is still a 'work in progress':

[link]

Just tweak it to your taste if you find it too dark, washed out or whatever. ;) Good luck!
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:iconcredmond8:
credmond8 Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2011
What font is it?
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:iconbohoomil:
bohoomil Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2011
Envy Code R in terminals and Terminus in WM. Give'em a try. :)

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:iconcredmond8:
credmond8 Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2011
Thanks. :) Just today I switched to Gohufont from Sans in URxvt.
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:iconjhenko:
jhenko Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2011
nice
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:iconbohoomil:
bohoomil Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2011
I'm really glad you like it, thank you very much. :)
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